Selective Functional Movement Screen (SFMA)

Selective Functional Movement Screen (SFMA)

 

 

 

 

The Selective Functional Movement Assessment (SFMA) is a series of 7 full-body movement tests designed to assess fundamental patterns of movement such as bending and squatting in those with known musculoskeletal pain. When the clinical assessment is initiated from the perspective of the movement pattern, the clinician has the opportunity to identify meaningful impairments that may be seemingly unrelated to the main musculoskeletal complaint, but contribute to the associated disability. This concept, known as Regional Interdependence, is the hallmark of the SFMA.


The assessment guides the clinician to the most dysfunctional non-painful movement pattern, which is then assessed in detail. This approach is designed to complement the existing exam and serve as a model to efficiently integrate the concepts of posture, muscle balance and the fundamental patterns of movement into musculoskeletal practice. By addressing the most dysfunctional non-painful pattern, the application of targeted interventions (manual therapy and therapeutic exercise) is not adversely affected by pain.

SFMA offers doctors and physical therapists a new approach to the treatment of pain and dysfunction. Our standardized clinical model ensures isolating the cause of injury and efficient care.

Testimonials

When I first came to see Dr McNally, I was in bad shape. After running the Boston Marathon for a second time, I had developed a chronic popping in my left knee. It was so bad, that I was worried I'd never be able to run long distances ever again. On top of that, I had developed chronic pain in my lower back that was keeping me awake for nights on end. 

From the moment I walked through the door, Dr McNally's energy, optimism and can-do spirit started my healing process. In just my first session, she diagnosed that I had a spondylolisthesis in my lower spine, I had a weak psoas muscle in my core, and that I was over-training the wrong muscles and under-training the muscles I needed for running.

She gave me a few simple exercises to do daily and talked me through what exercises were over-developing my quadriceps and hip flexers which were causing my knee popping. It wasn't easy adapting my gym routine, but I stuck to it (supported by her positivity and energy). Within two to three weeks, my knee popping subsided, and a few weeks after that, my back pain was gone for good.

I still do the exercises she gave me every day. They are so simple that I sometimes think that they couldn't have possibly brought this change in my life, but I have the evidence to prove it. I've dropped 90 seconds from my mile pace for my long runs, I walk taller, feel better, sleep like a baby, and this April, I'll be taking on the Boston Marathon again. This time, with Dr McNally's help, I'll definitely feel like a winner!

Ian Russell,

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